A few more updates…

A few exciting updates! I have moved into my cute new (albeit ant-filled) abode; my housemate, M, made a lovely pumpkin and potato dish for me as a little welcome-to-the-house dinner. She is totally wonderful! We have both experienced living in Javanese villages before and both have experience teaching English here, so we have a lot in common already, even though we are from two very different countries/cultures. I love being able to share a space with someone also experiencing expat life in Malang. I feel completely comfortable and at ease; I could get used to this…especially to the fact that I don’t have to do any cleaning besides my own dishes. Thank you, housecleaning boys! What a fortuitous outcome of the house-hunting (which lasted approximately one hour)! AND, we got wifi in the house today!!!

There is a rather extensive expat network here in Malang, and they have been so far quite welcoming. I like the fact that I will spend some time in my village each weekend (or most weekends, anyway) so I don’t feel like I’m getting too sucked in to the expat world. It’s not a bad place—decidedly not—but I do want to maintain my connections with my host family and the ‘real world.’ So far, my new friend J, from Poland, has been most supportive and helpful. She has given me a few tips about Malang already, which are handy since I haven’t actually lived here before: good shops for Western-style bread and cheese, a top-notch fitness center (where she, as a lady, feels comfortable working out), and ideas about transportation. We had a lovely time at the café today chatting it up and getting to know one another. There’s a gathering on Friday that I think I’ll attend so I can meet the rest of her crew.

The visa process is slowly but surely coming along. I should be able to pick up the documents on Friday, which means I can officially start collecting data. Our trip to the immigration office was something else; Mas T picked me up with Mbak R, a Thai student also applying for a visa, at 9:30 instead of 9 since he was waiting on the car to arrive, and the car wouldn’t start when we got in to leave. Someone walked over from campus to help fix it, and after we stopped at the ATM to get money for the visa fee, the car broke down again. Another friend came to help, and we made it to immigration, finally. On the way back to drop said friend off at his job, the car broke down again. A bunch of guys worked on it for a while, and Mas T drove Mbak R back to campus on a borrowed motorcycle, since she had to teach a class (but she didn’t make it; her students had already left by the time she got back to campus). Finally it started, and Mas T and I headed back, stopping for some really excellent nasi pecel on the way back. Got back to the office at 1:30 or so, and, perfectly, the internet on campus was down. Thus, I went ended up at the café with J, as mentioned. Too much!! But I do just love Mas T for all the hard work he does around campus. He is a great friend, too. (Actually, everyone I’ve met/re-met in the office is completely wonderful. Mbak E is just a goofball and a total pleasure to be around, Mas M works hard to get me to practice my Javanese, and Mbaks O and K seem like really nice ladies who will hopefully become my good friends.)

On the research front, there have also been some interesting developments. By way of the professor who sponsored me, Pak P, I have been connected with a couple of professors at my university who specialize, in one way or another, in a field of study related to my project. One of them, Pak H, was a fellow who helped out my training village in Peace Corps… he’s a hoot and a half, and then some other stuff on top of that. Apparently, unbeknownst to me, he is an anthropology professor and a former Fulbrighter who studied at University of Michigan. He also, apparently, knows just about everyone in East Java and has lots of friends who practice traditional medicine, shamanism, and various other healing techniques. I guess he practices something himself, too, plus he’s head of the American Corner here on campus (more on that in the future). He’s in Jakarta until later this month, and I’m eager to re-meet him and see what’s up. There’s also another professor, Pak HS, who’s an expert in philosophy (or so I gather) who may also be able to help me.

I’m plodding along developing my research questions and beginning to consider how to approach recruiting and interviewing someone… I think I may stick close to Malang for the first couple weeks’ worth of fieldwork (perhaps pilot interviews), so I can rely on the networks I’ve established ‘round these parts to get my feet wet. Mas T seems really interested in helping me in the field, and I can tell already that I made the right choice in choosing to come back to Malang. I couldn’t imagine starting afresh at another university considering I only have ten months, and I wouldn’t even want to start over fresh anywhere else!

I finished my first book the other day, which I started for pleasure during my first few days here so that I could have a little mental break: The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down by Anne Fadiman. It’s a non-fiction account of a family of Hmong refugees whose second-youngest member has epilepsy, which in Hmong culture predisposes her to becoming a shaman(ess). The book explores her family’s relationships with the American doctors who treat her and in doing so illuminates quite a bit about Hmong culture, history, language, medicine, and religion, as well as the author’s experiences working with the family and medical workers involved in the ‘case.’ I highly recommend it; I hope I forget enough about what happened so I can read it again before I go home. I haven’t read something so captivating in quite some time. I’ve since moved on to a practical book about ethnographic fieldnotes that is far less entertaining.

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