Under the spell!

I conducted a pilot interview this weekend!! It was with a dukun bayi or children’s healer (and massage/bathing specialist) in my village, and I think it went as well as could be expected for a trial run! I was lucky enough to have my host mother accompany me as language guru; the interviewee spoke about as much Indonesian as I do, and, of course, my Javanese is only so-so. But the interview was very successful, in my opinion, although I definitely have questions to re-work (and add). I measured the success by the total confusion and amazement I felt at the end; I’ve got a lot to learn, and it’s going to be fascinating. Without going into too much detail, the most interesting part of her story, for me, was that she had no formal training. None! She realized later in life and through a premonitory dream that she had the ability to heal children’s illness, and the whole venture into healing started with her own grandchild, whom she healed with intuitive massage after the doctors tried and failed to help him. A devout Muslim, she believes that her ability is a gift from Allah and that she should use it to help any and all children in need of care.

This story contrasts sharply with the interviews I conducted in the US, and since I’m thinking that this project will end up being a comparative analysis of the two types of healers’ experiences (i.e., Javanese and Anglo-American), the potential seems great already for some interesting and provocative results! Plus, on a personal level, I feel humbled and even more open to the learning process inherent in doing this type of cross-cultural “fieldwork.” I am a lucky lady.

Serendipitously, I have connected with an anthropologist here at UMM whose research interests overlap quite harmoniously with mine. He is Pak H, and I think I mentioned him in my previous entry. He’s someone I know from my Peace Corps days and was a Fulbrighter, too (University of Michigan, late 1980’s). We had lunch together yesterday; he seems quite excited about my project and very interested in helping me travel around to certain places to explore the world of traditional healing here. He’ll be sharing resources, too, and I plan to pick up a couple of books from him later today. We’ve already got two trips scheduled for October to a regency in East Java that’s famous for dukun, and apparently Pak H is already very well-connected to the healing community there since it’s also, !!!, where he’s from. He’s already mentioned my project to several of his connections, who have expressed interest in being interviewed. I could tell from just walking around campus with him that he is very well-connected and respected around here. Pak H says that ten months is more than enough time to accomplish the goals I’ve set out in my research proposal and that with his help, finding interesting and available participants will not be an obstacle. I suppose this makes him, at this point, my primary gatekeeper. How fortunate that he is also an expert in the field.

I can’t believe how things are falling into place! Again, I know there will be challenges, but so far… I’m not sure what I was worrying about all summer when I was making myself frantic with nerves and anxiety about whether I could do this. My friends and colleagues here are so aware of what kind of help I need, and they are more than gracious in extending their assistance wherever possible. I hope I can find a way to do my part for them; I am picking up on the concept of gotong royong (mutual cooperation), a very fundamental aspect of traditional Javanese culture that still thrives today, even in bigger, “modern” cities like Malang. I will have to take care to reciprocate all of the assistance I’ve been granted.

Overall, I’ve been very lucky so far in finding just the perfect people to help me adjust to being back in East Java. Several people, expats and locals alike, have been very gracious and open to assisting me, every bit as much as enthusiastically as Pak H. With the help of a lovely lady from Poland and Mas T, I’ve gotten hooked up with some good transportation and know-how. Thanks to my host family in the village, I feel secure and safe (host dad checked out my homestay and always provides advice on travel, social interaction, and financial issues). The Peace Corps safety and security officer in Surabaya has offered to help me hand-deliver some documents next week to the provincial authorities about my research, per instructions from the federal office to which I report. My new housemate has been so gracious in sharing her delicious foodstuffs, all of which she makes up off the top of her head like a true chef! And, of course, my new and old Indonesian friends have been so open to hanging out, making me feel right at home. My delightful new/old friend, Mas M, is being very diligent in helping/forcing me to practice my Javanese daily, and I love him for it! (He jokes that the reason I like him so much is because I ate an orange that he had had bewitched by a dukun with the express purpose of getting me to like him. But I just think he’s charming; anybody would like him. But then again I do feel I am under some kind of spell here…)

And, importantly, I finally connected with the American Corner here on campus, and reunited with Mas H, whom I last saw in DC a couple of months ago. Later in the semester, we’re going to collaborate on some projects for UMM students. Excitingly, I’ve been granted access to his wide library of English-language reading materials. (No more worrying about forcing Mom, Caitlin, and Lauren to send pleasure reading! Although by all means, please send anything you think I’d be interested in. Ha!) I checked out a Steinbeck novel yesterday, and it feels so good.

That’s all from me for now!
xo
Sammy

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Please follow me on Instagram @tisamlette if you are interested in seeing photos! I will post some here from time to time, I’m sure, but so far I have been posting mainly to Instagram…

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8 thoughts on “Under the spell!”

    1. Yes mom!!! 🙂 Excited about the Eng-lang library at Am. Corner. What luck!! Gotta make time to pleasure read ‘cuz I am not watching movies/TV except Indo-lang in the homestay… trying to avoid Western movies/TV this time around, ‘cuz I really feel it was a detriment to full immersion last time! I started using it as an escape and therefore a crutch! But I don’t think I need escapism as much now that I have more personal space and private time… so, that’s that. Pleasure reading is a better choice than watching movies/TV!! 🙂 xo

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  1. Enjoy reading your blog!! How exciting, but when you tell us you eat something exotic-sounding from a vendor, could you put that in our lingo — i.e., “sort of a fish taco”‘ or “kind-of like a shrimp goulash” ?!

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      1. oh my, reading your words is always delightful!!! but i am indeed reading for pleasure and slacking on the diss…reading margaret atwood’s the handmaid’s tale, until max got ahold of it and ate it….and just finished the trashy bringing up bébé, haha!

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