Play for fun

follow me on Instagram @tisamlette

It has been quite some time since I’ve written anything, and the plain and simple reason is that I’ve been very busy enjoying! About every single day has been jam-packed with something or other–research, volunteering, enjoying life here to the greatest extent possible (i.e. goofing off and enjoying friendships).

As it turns out, the international relations office (IRO) family spends multiple nights a week together after-hours being together and getting up to all sorts of silly and fun activities. Wednesday night is futsal (soccer on a small, indoor field), Friday afternoon is badminton, and we’ve been doing an awful lot of Asian-style karaoke (in individual rooms like in Lost in Translation, not the same as the regular, mortifying karaoke we unfortunate Americans are accustomed to). The part-time IRO staff members, mostly undergrads, also like going out in the evenings to find tasty food and/or go shopping. There have also been some exciting campus events, most notably a Confucius Institute talent show that was really stupendously amazing and surreal in its fantasticality. We’ve had a birthday party and a housewarming celebration, too. So, I’ve been swept up by reading and studying during the day and doing something exciting with friends basically every evening.

I went to the first futsal practice under the horribly misguided impression that at least some of the office girls would at least be there so I that could coax them into playing with me. Indonesian ladies are notoriously uninterested in playing futsal, probably because it is indeed quite rough and there just aren’t opportunities for them to build their interest in it like there are for young men (it’s a combination of structurally unequal opportunity and cultural disinterest in over-exertion and running around in athletic gear with a bunch of men). At the first practice, I was the only lady. I was honestly afraid of getting hurt, so I sat the first practice out, watching from the sidelines. I hadn’t ever played soccer before except once in my neighbor’s front yard up at the lake where my grandparents used to live, and it was nerve-wracking to think about jumping right in.

However, at the second practice, I knew what I was getting into and had time to mentally prepare myself to be the only girl on the pitch (and the worst player by far!!). The guys all knew it was my first time playing; luckily, they only play for fun. They don’t even keep score. Unfortunately, despite bucking up and representing the female sex on the pitch, it wasn’t a great day for breaking down gender-based stereotypes, ‘cuz I was a total wimp out there. I tried my best and at least worked up a sweat running up and down the sidelines, and I did get walloped by the ball pretty good on my arm by a tough and amazing South Korean kid (wah, the bruise lingers yet). I went into momentary shock when the ball hit me, but my Argentinean neighbor/buddy was right next to me and smartly asked me if I wanted to take a break. I think he sensed that I was stunned! Looking back, getting hurt right from the outset was an okay experience; I’m more prepared to keep trying and I know what to expect. It’s not so dire. Futsal is super fun, and everyone I play with is really goofy and laughs a lot the whole time. It’s a great workout, too, of course. It’s so nice to be physically active here in Indonesia, and a welcomed change from Peace Corps rural-village-lady life (I just didn’t get enough exercise back then and I think it contributed to heightened levels of near-depression).

Also very silly at the outset was family karaoke. It’s done here in little rooms that have a display screen, a couple of microphones, and a digital display that let’s participants select songs. Plus snacks. And sweet tea served in “Bintang” beer mugs (Mas M and Mas T just love joking around about drinking beer while karaoke-ing). Everyone sings with reckless abandon, even if their voice is awful by conventional standards. Songs are in Javanese, English, Indonesian—anything you please. Popular hits from the US/Europe include emotional love ballads and emo pop-punk; I sang some Abba songs, a couple of Celine songs, even a Metallica song. Luckily, most of these were duets. I sang the “Cups” song from whatever musical that is during the first visit to family karaoke, and then, the second time, I was requested to sing first and sing that song! I can’t be doing so bad. There’s a lot of silliness, dancing, and hooting and hollering at family karaoke time. Like futsal, it’s completely done for fun, and nobody cares if your voice is abysmal. I never thought I would like karaoke so much, or sing it so energetically. I have done karaoke twice, exactly twice (two songs) in the US, and I hated it. But when you’re in a little room goofing around with your pals, it’s pretty sweet and satisfying. I’ve already been four times or so since I last wrote. Almost weekly!

Another exciting and new regular activity in my life is weekly badminton practice. Who would ever have imagined that my regular activities would be soccer, karaoke, and badminton? As you can probably guess, it doesn’t matter if you are terrible at badminton. It’s better if you’re good (at all of these things), but it’s totally great anyways if you are just purely terrible. The first time I went, I played along, and my right forearm hurt for two days. Did you know that Indonesians are really good at badminton? It’s very easy to over-extend oneself playing badminton with Indonesians. Think of whatever stereotype you have about Chinese ping pong skills; that’s roughly the skill level of Indonesians with badminton. Apparently, they are one of the top two best countries in the world at badminton, although I forget what the other one is at the moment. Anyways, badminton is great, and the ladies do enjoy playing this less intensive, less running-y sport. Mas M’s wife is a stunner and apparently played in college; she beats me every time. The boys are so silly and vicious and often fall down on the floor in fits of contagious laughter when something silly or amazing happens. I’m slowly getting better, too. Last week, the 4th or 5th week attending, the team I was on actually won!! Not really important, but hey. First time for everything.

Oh, last week I scored my first goal at futsal. Actually the first goal in my life! I made four attempts and made one. Mas T was goalkeeping and swears he didn’t let me get away with anything. Also I ended up with two additional bruises, one on my calf and one on my thigh…thankfully, as of now, I have no bruises from badminton or karaoke.

This week, a lovely Puerto Rican lady whose studying Indonesian at UMM (yes, there are technically two Americans on this campus!) introduced me to a ladies-only fitness spot in Malang, which is great news as I had been snooping around for a gym with Mas M, with displeasing results. In keeping with the theme of light fitness for ladies, most gyms are oriented towards male clients, i.e. totally grungy and full of testosterone. Sorry, males. I visited one of these horrid places just to look at it and got quite stared at and felt great discomfort. However, the ladies-only gym has fulfilled all my wildest gym fantasies and more!! They have several classes a day, and I’ve so far been going to the hip hop classes. They are very challenging. There’s no AC or fans, and the classroom is on the second floor. We get really soaking wet with sweat and I look quite silly trying to do hip hop. BUT, who cares, it’s fun! I’m going to attend a yoga class tonight and see how that goes. They’ve also got various other aerobic classes, like zumba and pilates. There is enough exercise equipment (weights, cardio machines) to satisfy me, too. Best part? It’s $9 per month! Love you, Sanggar Senam Inda.

Many evenings, the part-timers will invite me out to find food or coffee around Malang, often to the big enormous mega-malls where things cost a pretty penny (relatively speaking) but are a welcomed escape from regular coffee made at home and rice plus tempe and veggies. We’ve been hopping around from café to café, sometimes working on homework, sometimes doing a little shopping, almost always taking selfies. The part-timers are so sweet, and I get the sense that they don’t enjoy much time with other international people (even though they seem eager to hang with me and so possibly feel interested in developing friendships with other internationals?). The part-timers seem very happy to spend time with me, and I reciprocate for sure. There are always many foreigners coming in and out of IRO, and my sense is that the part-timers rarely make social connections with them, probably or most likely because of language barriers. The international student coordinator is trying to organize a big trip for the foreigners and office staff together in order to build stronger relationships among office staff, and hopefully this can happen! I also hope I get to go to Bromo and/or the beach with the part-timers in the near future, as they’ve suggested we do together.

There are also some part-timers in the American Corner on campus that love goofing off, too. We had a silly Halloween party, which maybe you saw pictures of, and the students made me up as an Indonesian zombie. I had a lot of fun and actually scared a few people. I’m sure I could only ever scare young Indonesians. I’ve never been scary on Halloween in my whole life. Success!

Another item of business that has been keeping me busy lately was my participation in an international seminar on campus this week. It was based on the theme of institutionalizing Indonesian language as an international and academic/scientific language, and there were presenters and guest speakers from all over Indonesia. Although there were some slightly unnerving presentations with undertones deriding local languages and cultures in favor of unification through shared (dominant) language and national identity/culture, I enjoyed participating… what can you do? I posed a few questions to those speakers suggesting, however subtly, that local languages should be slowly colonized by Indonesian and Indonesian should be all citizen’s first language, trying to get someone to articulate the relationship between language loss and devaluation of local cultures…I don’t think my point came across as I had intended, so all I can do is try to be an example by studying the local language here and valuing the culture as well. For better or for worse, a foreigner showing interest and appreciation for local language and culture can go a long way in terms of demonstrating that these things shouldn’t be allowed to disappear or to be subsumed in the name of nationalism. I don’t think local languages and cultures should disappear. I don’t think all Indonesians want this, either…although it is a fact that people from rural areas where local languages are spoken will have a hard time if they go to the city to look for a job and have sub-par Indonesian language skills. I’m getting off track; this seems like a good discussion for a future post.

Anyways, I gave a little talk at the conference about my experiences learning Indonesian as a second language, since I was asked to participate two nights before I needed to make a submission and didn’t have enough time to prepare anything more substantial. I decided after listening to the opening ceremony of the conference that I should deliver my talk in Indonesian to the best of my abilities, even though the facilitators said I could use English if I wanted. But why would I, if the topic is all about building up Indonesian as an international language? I also decided not to prepare my talk beforehand and have an Indonesian friend correct it, because I wanted to demonstrate to the listeners what my real skills were by speaking as naturally and spontaneously as possible, flaws and all. I ended up giving the talk in about 85-90% Indonesian and the rest in English (except 0.5% in Javanese, just to get a few laughs). The lady who presented after me was a master’s degree holding professor of Indonesian who gave a talk about how people should really work hard to speak proper and correct Indonesian in order to fulfill their patriotic and civic duty, and she told me repeatedly that my Indonesian was very good (and she’d probably harass an Indonesian who spoke Indonesian at my ability level). So, I count this as a victory, even though I’m sure I made some mistakes and my face was as red as a tomato the whole time.

Let’s see… the last thing I want to update about is my research. I have been reading a lot a lot a lot, mostly working to wrap my head as much as possible around what I’ve been hearing. I have had a couple more interviews since I last blogged, as well, and these have been just as interesting as the previous set. I still need at least two more proper participants and then I will be ready to start preparing for whatever follow-up interviews need to happen. I’ve started looking for transcribers and translators for the next phase of the project, but have had minimal success with the initial candidates. I’m going to consult with the “International Language Fellows” group on campus, which is made up of about 700 well-rounded, academically talented undergraduate students; one of my new pals, Lia, is the treasurer of this group, so she is going to help me recruit people who are interested in transcribing and translating the interviews for me. Delegate, delegate! I simply cannot do the transcriptions, since more than half of the material is in Javanese, which I cannot spell (and I can’t always decipher the individual words, anyways). I really hope the ILF group comes through!!

Other news: I’m happy to share that I’ll be presenting on my project in late March in Macau, which is a Special Autonomous Region (SAR) of China. The conference is run by Danish scholars and the theme is, roughly, folklore and the supernatural in island nations. I’m super excited and looking forward to travelling around Macau, which, if you don’t know anything about, you should explore. The Anthony Bourdain episode on Macau is a good place to start (it’s on YouTube). I had no idea how weird and unique Macau is, and I find it fitting that I’ll be ending up in such a strange and quirky place for my first presentation about this strange and quirky research project.

I think that’s about it for now; I promise to update more regularly from now on! I have been letting myself get lost in the activities of daily life here, and I think it’s wise to step back and process a little more thoroughly (lest I “go native,” which I sometimes feel I’ve already done based on what some of the newcomer foreigners have said to me about myself, my behavior, etc). I’ve got more to share: I’ve been doing some guest lecturing at middle schools and at the university, visiting Tlekung and having fun times with the host family, and planning my trips to Magetan and Jogjakarta in a couple of weeks. I’ve also been scaring myself with ghost stories and killing mosquitoes like that’s what my Fulbright is really all about. Also, I have a little ‘potted’ plant garden, two new roommates, some stories of visiting friends’ homes, and some negativity (yes, it exists) I want to get off my chest… alas, fodder for another day, my loves.

Best, biggest cinta forever,
Sammy

PS: I officially expressed my intention to Indiana University to pursue doctorate studies there next fall, pending funding/assistantship, of course. If I am funded, Lauren and I will be giving it a try in Bloomington next August!

— follow me on Instagram @tisamlette —

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3 thoughts on “Play for fun”

  1. I had been wondering if I had missed some post, so happy to see I hadn’t and didn’t really have to sign up to follow you again, that indeed I was already following you. Sounds fabulous and I am so excited to hear your doing so well, enjoying so much more, learning, growing. I’m looking forward to checking out Macau and find it still, so fascinating that not only are you teaching there but teaching me also to expand my self, thank you Sammi, Love and miss you, thank you for your most eloquent posting. Looking forward to the next adventure. Auntie Kim

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  2. Oh joy, joyous little time reading this!! (Happy to see I’m not the only one missing your posts, based on Auntie’s comment and Lauren’s in the previous entry…!!!) Thanks, Sammy!!! I love hearing about your adventures in fun and how you are really putting yourself out there, although I am not surprised at that last since you have always tried new things! Congratulations on your presentation in Macau!!!!!! That makes me giddy with excitement for you and I wish I could be there!!! Sounds so full of awesome stories and people and magical things!! Doing a little dance for IU 😀 we love you!!!!!!

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